1 More to go for the last exam. I can’t wait for this practical to be over but I feel extremely sad at the same time since it essentially means – that’s it! I’m all done and it’s time to go. I’ve really enjoyed myself these last 6 months and I am so going to miss my Stream 4 family. But fear not, this won’t be a post waxing poetic on my time at FPS (hmmm maybe I’ll save that for next week when it’s all over and I’m lamenting my return to the reality of the working world…in a freakin’ recession). Instead I cannot sleep again tonight and at nearly 4am I decided to do a little post on…sugar blowing, using glassblowing as a visual. Sounds random, (ok it is kinda random to be thinking of this at 4am but I have it on the brain since I have a few hours tomorrow to put together a showpiece) but sugar blowing and glassblowing share a lot of similarities.

For this we head to Talisman Glass, where me and some girls from school checked out their once a year open house. As we made our way into the studio there was a table of glass ornaments. Way better constructed than the ones at the local store but at ~$30 each they aint cheap!

Glass Ornaments

So instead of that hot piece of glass picture a hot piece of cooked sugar the size of a large lychee attached to tubing with a pump and instead of the oven we use sugar lamps.
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

As the piece is being blown, you can place it against a cooler surface to drop the temp at that spot and shape it as you want.
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

If need be you can heat again to make it more pliable. I think at this point the piece below is flared out and he’s spinning it to spread the diameter.
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

Once it’s the shape you want, the piece needs to cool.
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

And gets detached from the piping (glass)/tubing (sugar)
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

And there you have your blown piece of glass/sugar! (Alessandra not included.)
Glassblowing at Talisman Glass

Now…time to sleep…

Advertisements